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The Most Epic Kills from 'True Blood' Seasons I-V

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True Blood's Season 6 is off to a great start. Episode one laid the groundwork for a lot of interesting story arcs that will manifest over the course of the season. Episode two hit the ground running. We’ve already witnessed one epic kill this season. The death of the woman from human edibles was outrageous. Bill used his newfound abilities to seemingly telekinetically move her towards him and produce a river of blood that poured out of her mouth and in to his. A horrified Jessica observed the whole ordeal from a distance. But, that was probably just the beginning. This season is bound to deliver more epic kills as the story continues to unfold. 
 
In celebration of the return of everyone’s favorite supernatural soap opera, we put together a list spotlighting nine of our favorite death scenes from the series’ first five seasons. Behold, our picks for some of the most epic kills from True Blood Seasons I-V:
 
Sam flies into Rosalyn’s mouth and shifts, causing her to explode
 
 
For us, this is one of the best deaths ever committed to film or television. It was so creative and the outcome was brutal as all hell. The look on Rosalyn’s face, right before she exploded, was priceless. When Sam shifted back in to human form and Rosalyn’s remains scattered around him, I could barely believe my eyes. The effect was pulled off seamlessly. It looked like a combination of CG and practical effects and the result was outstanding. It didn’t have the fake appearance of a completely digital effect, but perhaps CGI was used to enhance and clean up the scene. 
 
Eric stakes Russell after absorbing too much fae light
 
 
This was a worthy exit for a larger than life character. I was thrilled when Russell came back for another season, but I was equally thrilled by his epic death. It was a death fit for a king – which he was. After absorbing too much Fae light, Russell was staked by Eric. The excess Fae light in his body caused his death to take on the appearance of a firework, more so than the typical vampire blood explosion we have grown accustomed to. The result was awesome. 
 
Sookie stakes Mike the coroner with chopsticks from her Chinese takeout
 
 
This entire sequence was a little strange. I didn’t realize that Mike the coroner had been made a vampire and I didn’t really remember any set up for the scene. I don’t think it really tied in to a bigger storyline, either. But getting to see Sookie shove chopsticks in to the parish coroner was perhaps reason enough to write it in to the episode. The resulting death was extremely memorable and the sheer creativity behind it made the entire sequence a great deal of fun to watch. 
 
Sookie and Bill Kill Lorena
 
 
I hated Lorena and I thought she would never die. She was older and more powerful than Bill and as his maker was always finding ways to make his life difficult. When Bill and Sookie finally bested her, I was thrilled to see her go. She went out with a bang, too. With Bill holding her down and Sookie driving a stake through her heart, Lorena finally met with the true death. I cannot say that I have missed her character. I actually cheered during the original broadcast. 
 
Roman Stakes Chancellor Alexander Drew
 
 
It was a bit of a revelation to discover that Chancellor Drew was a closet fundamentalist. But, it provided for an interesting plot twist and a pretty brutal death. Roman, and most of the other authority members, ended up with blood and vampire remains all over their faces and clothing. In spite of being a noteworthy kill, this scene proved to be somewhat controversial. Though, the Alexander Drew character was much older than his body lets on, his death still provided the appearance of a grown man killing a ten year old boy. And that ruffled a few feathers. But, in the show’s defense, Chancellor Drew was a centuries old vampire – he just happened to have been turned at a young age. 
 
Jason Kills Franklin
 
 
Franklin was the source of much trouble for Tara. What started out as a one-night stand turned in to the worst nightmare of her life. Franklin abused her, both physically and mentally. Right as we thought he was about to kill Tara, Jason came out of nowhere and shot Franklin with a wooden bullet. It was nice to see Jason rescuing Tara, again and the experience provided for some interesting aftermath between Tara and Jason. Franklin went out with a bang and provided some welcome violence for the gore hound in all of us. 
 
Mary Anne’s death
 
 
Mary Anne was seemingly unstoppable. She was resistant to vampire bites and possessed great strength as well as the power of thought control. Her glorification of carnality and excess came to a screeching halt on what she thought was going to be her wedding night. Sam shifted in to what Mary Anne believed was ‘The god who comes’ and impaled her in a stroke of brutal genius. When Sam shifted back in to human form, we got to see the defeated look on her face as she collapsed to her death.  
 
Bill and Eric Kill Nan Flannigan
 
 
Nan’s death surprised me. That’s what I love about True Blood. It’s always throwing unexpected twists and turn at viewers. The writers and producers are not afraid to kill off characters that have been on the show for a long time. Anything is fair game and the end result is often unexpected. Nan died a messy death. She ended up all over Bill’s office. The plus side to Nan’s death was that it opened the door for Steve Newlin to take over her role as the VRA spokesperson. His smarmy antics have added to a couple of interesting sub-plots since Nan’s death.  
 
Bill’s Guards Kill Queen Sophie Anne
 
 
After a Matrix style brawl and some witty banter, Bill sent his guards after Queen Sophie Anne and they ended her reign as the Queen of Louisiana as well as her life. Sophie Anne’s death was noteworthy for many reasons. It opened doors for Bill and it didn’t skimp on gore. It was a little bittersweet, as her character injected a hearty dose of sarcasm and personality in to the series. But, in hindsight, with such a rich cast of core characters, I cannot say that she’s actually been missed that much. 
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