Review

Review

FEARNET Movie Review - Feast 2: Sloppy Seconds

up
33

Instead of dealing with ravenously nasty (and horny) monsters within the confines of a dingy bar, we're now treated to an entire town that's been overrun by rapacious creatures. So while the filmmakers do a fine job of creating an unexpectedly arcane ensemble piece, Feast 2 loses a little steam here and there as the characters bounce from hotel to garage to rooftop. Fortunately there's an ample dose of splattery mayhem at every stop, which means that newcomers to the Feast flicks should prepare themselves for some resoundingly anti-PC dispatches.

By Scott Weinberg

If you witnessed the third season of the Project Greenlight series, then you're already well aware that the film Feast was not exactly easy to create. And once the flick was finally finished and ready for viewing, the distribution plans went a little wacky, which meant that most horror fans simply had to wait for the DVD -- which actually had more carnage than the theatrical cut, so at least the fans got extra goodies for being patient.

But after all that trouble, it sure looks like Feast did more than well enough on the DVD market to warrant a sequel or two. And since the entire creative team from the first film (screenwriters Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton, director Jon Gulager) are back for Feast 2: Sloppy Seconds, it only stands to reason that chapter 2 should work as well and chapter 1. Which it does, to a point, although I'm still a but more partial to the claustrophobic intensity of the first film.

Picking up right where Feast left off, Sloppy Seconds (an accurate title if ever there was one) introduces us to a colorful bunch of characters -- some of whom are survivors from the initial monster-fest, and several others who are entirely new to the party. The dynamics are pretty much the same, although the setting is quite a bit different: Instead of dealing with ravenously nasty (and horny) monsters within the confines of a dingy bar, we're now treated to an entire town that's been overrun by rapacious creatures. So while the filmmakers do a fine job of creating an unexpectedly arcane ensemble piece, Feast 2 loses a little steam here and there as the characters bounce from hotel to garage to rooftop. Fortunately there's an ample dose of splattery mayhem at every stop, which means that newcomers to the Feast flicks should prepare themselves for some resoundingly anti-PC dispatches.

In other words, this flick will find a way to devour every demographic. Nobody is safe in this wacky little gore-fest; not the kids or the dogs or the handicapped or the elderly. Feast 2 is an equal opportunity chomp-'em-up all the way. Also included is a welcome sense of twisted humor that prevents the carnage from being too distressing, because I don't really think the flick is meant to scare you as much as it's trying to make you moan, groan, chuckle, and maybe mutter something like "Ewww, gross!" (There's an autopsy scene here that may rank among the splatteriest sequences ever shot for an American film. It's very gross and very funny.)

Returnees Jenny "Honey Pie" Wade and Clu "Bartender" Gulager get several of the movie's best lines (and they share a brawl that's shockingly amusing), but there's also some very strong work from Diane Goldner as our heroic lesbian biker woman and Martin Klebba as a wrestler / key-maker who tries to save the day on more than one occasion. And pretty much fails.

Shot with rather limited funds -- as well as back-to-back with Feast 3: The Happy Finish (coming soon) -- Feast 2 has a few slow spots and a handful of pretty sketchy CGI splashes, but it also boasts a good deal of twisted wit and energetic insanity. If you dug the first one, I'm pretty darn sure you'll enjoy the second visit to ths Feast buffet. Bring a few extra napkins though.

READ FEARnet's PARTNER REVIEWS OF FEAST 2

<none>