Review

Review

TV Recap: 'Grimm' Episode 110 - 'Organ Grinders'

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Grimm Episode 110

"Organ Grinder"

Written By: Akela Cooper & Spiro Skentzos

Directed By: Clark Mathis

Original Airdate: 3 February 2012

In This Episode...

A corpse washes up on the river bank. His name is Steven, 18, a street kid whose blood was drained almost completely, but died from drowning. Nick and Hank's investigation leads them to Hansen and Gracie, homeless teen siblings who sell puka necklaces in the park. They said that Steven, along with another homeless friend Kevin, went with some guys in a white van who were looking for ranch hands. The last time Gracie saw Steven was when they went with him to the free clinic to get treated for a spider bite.

Nick and Hank get called to the scene of a fatal car accident. Nick is perplexed as to why they would be called - until they show up and discover the victim was illegally transporting human organs and blood - some of it Steven's, some of it not. The organs have to belong to someone. Before he dies, the victim reveals his Grimm face to Nick. After consulting with Monroe, they decide it is a geier. Like ancient Eastern herbalists, many Grimm creatures believe that human organs have medicinal properties. Monroe goes to one of these herbal shops and scores some "herbs" which Nick has tested - it is pure, ground human gall bladder.

Nick confronts the herbalist, who admits to selling the stuff out of pure fear. He gives Nick the phone number of his contact, and Nick (with back up) trace it to a trailer parked in the middle of the woods. A shoot-out ends up with the trailer's owner being shot. What Nick initially thinks is a greenhouse out back is actually a room where hundreds of human organs are in various stages of being dried out. A call comes in on the dead man's cell phone - from the clinic. A search warrant is immediate, but the kids are not being cut up at the clinic. Nick scares that info out of a clinic employee who also happens to be a geier.

The cops swarm a large house out in the woods. Nick sees a trail of puka shells like the ones on the necklaces that Gracie wears. He and Hank follow the trail around back to a garage or shed. Gracie, Hansen, Kevin, and a handful of other street kids are inside, strapped to beds. The doctor from the clinic, Levine, is about to cut into Gracie. Hanks stays behind to care for the kids while Nick chases Levine into the woods. A fight ensues, and Nick ends up throwing Levine into the flaming bonfire pit that is normally reserved for the corpses after they have been harvested of useful organs.

Also: Nick contemplates telling Juliette about his "gift"; Monroe warns him against it. The captain gets a "gift" of his own - the ear the cut off from a guy earlier in the season, courtesy of a shadowy voice over the phone. The ear is a warning for the captain to confront Nick about his Grimm-iness - something the captain is loathe to do.

Dig It or Bury It?

I think this has been the best episode of Grimm so far. It offered the perfect blend of police procedural, Grimm lore, and disgustingness. I have always been fascinated by those urban legends of tourists waking in a tub of ice with a missing kidney. This is just an extreme version of it. I also think this was a great modern interpretation of Hansel and Gretel. 

Big Bad...

...Geiers. These clawed creatures harvest organs from live victims, relishing the pain they cause. Geiers harvest organs, dry them out, grind them out, and sell them like medicine. Many ancient Eastern cultures believe that ground up rhino horns (for example) have medicinal properties. The difference is, those don't work. But human organs are extremely effective on certain Grimm creatures.

Gory Details

There was a lot of gore to enjoy. To start, the corpse from the opening scene was bloated and icky even before the bird pecked his eyes out. Then there was that room that was just filled with organs. Some on racks to dry, others hanging from ropes like salamis. Just weird and gruesome.

Prophecies?

The "black widow" metaphor turns literal when a woman weaves a "web" of heartbreak and dead bodies.

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